Muffragette

Mary Bourke: Muffragette

So I opened my festival experience with a show that sounded like fun! I imagined it being some sort of extra-special, all singing, all dancing lesbo-feminism which would right up my street. I had my heart set. After a lot of talking it up I convinced my girlfriend (renown to be a reluctant hero when it comes to politics / feminism / my ranting) to accompany me. Now this required an after work race down to the Stand, as the show is inconveniently (for Edinburgh residents) shown at 17.50, literally just after work with little room for travel time.

After all the persuading I then read the shows write-up in the Festival brochure (I know I got over-excited at the title) and began to worry that my gung-ho attitude had been a little extreme. It had one line that stood out,

‘feminism without all the boring preachy bits’

which made me worry that we were about to go and see the ‘I’m a feminist, but not really a feminist’ brand of comic.

However, I shouldn’t have worried. I left feeling like I had had a nice hot cup of tea in a cosy chair. Comfortable, cheerful, but my life definitely wasn’t changed. It’s a nice show that raises some contemporary feminist issues like the constant barrage of twitter trolls who attempt to rule the internet, and the number of magazines on our supermarket shelves that seamlessly objectify and degrade women. The latter was demonstrated impeccably by a young man who replicated a number of the delightful poses that we see in lads mags (if you can’t imagine it, some similar examples can be seen here: http://www.buzzfeed.com/jpmoore/men-ups-manly-men-in-classic-pin-up-poses). My only slight concern was the number of ‘Your Mum’ jokes which the comic admits to planning on behalf of one part of a TV presenting couple! Blame the man, not the Mam, for his bad behaviour Mary!

I had no complaints. The show was nice and feel good. I would definitely recommend it to those of you who have friends who are yet to realise their feminism.  It’s accessible, non-aggressive and a good introduction to the challenges faced by women in 2013. However, to anyone well versed in their contemporary feminism looking for something to challenge, inform or broaden their feminism, this is definitely not your gig.

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