Tag Archives: Glasgow Pride

Manchester Pride: a parade for the privileged?

flag2

It’s easy to see Manchester pride as a massive success: it’s one of the few Prides which is omnipresent throughout the city attracting people from across the UK and wider – amazing! But this year made us question whether Pride in and of itself is intrinsically valuable to the LGBT+ community.

Continue reading

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Gay Agenda is Proud: Rhianna

This week, in the lead up to Glasgow Pride, we decided to interview some of our writers to find out what Pride means to them!

What’s your name, age and where do you come from?

Hi Cilla, my name’s Rhianna, I’m 25 and I’m originally from Ely but I live in Glasgow

Why did you get involved in the Gay Agenda?

I am very opinionated. I think we need more outlets to discuss issues for queer women in the UK

What do you write about?

Queer issues, trans* issues and books!

Photo by John: http://bit.ly/17ByjOy

Photo by John: http://bit.ly/17ByjOy

What do you do in real life?

I’m about to start an MRes in Equality and Human Rights, I work in a museum and I read a lot of books.

Why is Pride important to you?

It’s a really good platform for campaigning on the current issues for queer and LGBT people and you feel part of a community out in the street. You know you can hold hands with your girlfriend and won’t get shouted at for it.

What is your best and worst part of pride?

The people are the best bit. Everyone’s so happy to be out regardless of the weather or whatever else might be going on. The worst bit is all the commercialisation. All the pubs, clubs and the like that turn up to promote their drink prices and don’t give a shit about the protest part. Pride isn’t about pubs.

What’s your must-have item for Pride?

Rainbow clothes! I don’t fit in for many reasons – one of those is my fashion sense or lack thereof – and it’s nice to not be judged for wearing rainbow flares. Well not too judged.

If you had a placard for Pride what would it say?

“Gender Extender”. Actually it would probably say “Fuck gender binaries”.

fuck gender norms and barriers

What’s you Pride soundtrack?

Androgyny – Garbage

Best ever Pride you’ve been to?

The all merge into one actually. Probably Pride Glasgow a couple of years ago. I can’t remember what I was getting a petition signed for but I got a few hundred signatures and talked to loads of people. It was great.

What are you proud of?

I’m proud of us. I’m proud that we fight for our rights and how we fight for them. We are creative campaigners: we march, we blog, we have catchy chants, historically we’ve staged die ins and kiss ins. We are a movement changing the world one chant at a time.

Tagged , , , , ,

The Gay Agenda is Proud: Hazel

This week, in the lead up to Glasgow Pride, we decided to interview some of our writers to find out what Pride means to them!

What’s your name, age and where do you come from?

Hi, I’m Hazel, I’m 23 and I’m originally from London, although I now live in Edinburgh.

Why did you get involved in the Gay Agenda?

I really admire some of the fabulous blogs out there aimed at queer women like The Most Cake, Autostraddle, Fuck Yeah Dykes and Diva. They inspired me to want to be part of the amazing online queer community which has bloomed over the last few years!

What do you write about?

I do a bit of everything! But mainly I write about current affairs, collate and I edit.

What do you do in real life?

I currently work in inclusive education at the University of Edinburgh.

Mug cinema 2

Why is Pride important to you?

I have always been keen for Pride. I remember my first ever Pride in London, I met up with a friend beforehand and we stood at the side of the road and watched the march pass by. Although I only watched that year I felt part of a  vibrant community, had a wonderful day, and couldn’t wait to be a part of the march at my next pride. At that time I didn’t really understand the historical significance of Pride, but I knew it was about celebrating a community I could be part of, and that was good enough. It’s been many years now since my first pride, and I have learned a ton about queer history and have given a few talk on it. It is still important to me as an experience that can bring queer people together to celebrate our community, but it’s also important as a protest to the homo-, trans*- and bi- phobias that we experience every day.

What is your best and worst part of pride?

I love Pride for the space it gives queer communities to celebrate ourselves! It’s always been a happy day for me. The worst however, is the bit in between the march and the nightlife where there is not a lot to do, but no real point in going home.

What’s your must-have item for Pride?

A big bottle of water. I am a big fan of chanting in the march, and I always shout myself hoarse.

If you had a placard for Pride what would it say?

I have made a lot of placards, and it’s always tough to think of slogans! But I like something simple like ‘love is love’.

What’s you Pride soundtrack?

Best ever Pride you’ve been to?

Although I’ve been to lots of prides up and down the country, my favourite Pride is still London Pride. It was my first ever Pride, and I try and make sure I’m in town whenever it is.

Tagged , , , , , ,

The Gay Agenda is Proud: Brittany

This week, in the lead up to Glasgow Pride, we decided to interview some of our writers to find out what Pride means to them!

What’s your name, age and where do you come from?

Brittany – I was born and raised in Devon, UK. I’m half German and also I’m part Scottish/English and I’m 19.

Why did you get involved in the Gay Agenda?

I love to write, it seemed like a fantastic opportunity to write about something I feel really strongly about. I want to become more involved within the LGBT+ community as I was never able to before having grown up in a somewhat homophobic area.

What do you write about?

For the Gay Agenda, I tend to write about gender and sexuality, however, I am more than happy to widen that to include art, music and religion, as I am pretty involved with all of that.

What do you do in real life?

I am an artist pretending to be a scientist. I am studying Developmental Biology/Biochemistry. I work in a museum, I write for the Gay Agenda as well as short stories and novellas. I’m an artist and I do take commissions for virtually anything and I’m an archer and I compete for the University of Edinburgh. I have absolutely no idea what I want to do with this life, but I’m going to keep as many options open as I can. I’m just trying to make my way in the world and stay as far away from the past as I possibly can.

She really is an artist, look!

She really is an artist, look!

Why is Pride important to you?

Having never been to a Pride, the following questions aren’t as easy to answer, however, I’d say that the meaning behind it is particularly important – the message that we should be proud, or at least happy, with being who we are and not having to hold back or hide ourselves from the world. It would be idealistic to be able to not have any worries about not being straight and I only hope that Pride and anything to do with that will help us move in that direction, as I’m sure we all know, we are far from that. I think Pride is potentially a fantastic way of allowing people to accept themselves for whom they are and what they want to do – or at least, that’s what I’d love to get out of a Pride.

What is your best and worst part of pride?

I’d say that the best thing I’d like to get out of going to Pride would be to meet more people of varying sexualities, I don’t know how I’ve managed to do this, but I literally do not know anyone that isn’t straight. It would be so refreshing to meet some people that I can relate to, especially in regard to actually coming out (I haven’t really come out to anyone and so I’m still trying to figure out how to go about that.) I’m sure just being able to not have any walls up around other people would be lovely as I have never been able to let my guard down too much. The worst thing about a Pride? I can imagine that you can come across some people that are narrow minded about being something other than completely gay and that would worry me, as I identify as one of the many sexualities in the middle. I’m sure they’re relatively few, but I have known of (at least) in the past a few people that are “straight/bi/pan-phobic”.

What’s your must-have item for Pride?

I’d definitely say that I’d like to have either a camera or a sketchpad and graphite. I’d love to keep photos of whatever happens as I’m sure it’d be such an amazing time, but if that doesn’t work out, if it doesn’t irritate too many people – I’d sit there and sketch people as they’re having a drink (or several).

If you had a placard for Pride what would it say?

I’d have to really think about that; all I know is that I’d have to include “Never be defeated” in there.

What’s you Pride soundtrack?

Roses – Poets of the Fall, it may seem a little random, but it is one of my favourite songs (and bands) and it’s always managed to brighten up my day.

Best ever Pride you’ve been to?

We’ll see soon, I hope!

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Gay Agenda is Proud: Julie

This week, in the lead up to Glasgow Pride we decided to interview some of our writers to find out what Pride means to them!

What’s your name, age and where do you come from?

I’m Julie, soon to be 27, from Wishaw, North Lanarkshire.

Why did you get involved in the Gay Agenda?

I love writing and think it’s a great opportunity to share ideas and get creative with lots of other really interesting, diverse women.

What do you write about?

I plan to write comment pieces on LGBT+ rights, current affairs and anything else that gets me thinking. I also enjoy writing a good open letter.

What do you do in real life?

I work in a university students’ association, supporting elected officers with all aspects of student representation.

Why is Pride important to you?

For me, Pride is still, first and foremost, a protest. It’s important to celebrate how far we’ve come but also to highlight that we’ve a long way still to go. Until LGBT+ people are not only equal in the eyes of the law but also of society, both in the UK but worldwide, Pride is still necessary as a form of political protest.

What is your best and worst part of pride?

The best part of Pride for me is seeing everyone coming together and celebrating how proud they are to be themselves; whatever that may be. The worst part is the vibe I get that Pride belongs to those who hang around on the scene every week. Pride belongs to everyone and, whether you go for the protest, the party or a bit of both, every single person should feel like they are included and belong there.

What’s your must-have item for Pride?

The biggest rainbow flag I can find!

Pride parachute

This is definitely big enough.

Picture by lewishamdreamer: http://bit.ly/15DVbRV

If you had a placard for Pride what would it say?

This year I’ll be carrying a Russian flag along with my rainbow one instead of a placard. Last year Moscow banned Pride for 100 years and things are pretty grim for LGBT Russians right now so I want to acknowledge that. If anyone can think of a catchy slogan for my flag, let me know!

At night-time I might chill out a bit and go for the tried and tested “I’m here, I’m queer, who’s buying me a beer?”

What’s you Pride soundtrack?

Same Love by Macklemore and Ryan Lewis

Best ever Pride you’ve been to?

Funnily enough, I’ve only been to Pride once before; also in Glasgow. I always seem to be out the country when it’s on. That was a few years ago and I just walked around taking everything in and bagged freebies from the stalls, but this year I hope to get more involved with everything that’s going on.

What are you proud of?

First and foremost I am proud of who I am. Gay/lesbian/queer, whatever you want to call it, I wouldn’t change it for the world. I wish my 13-year-old self could see me now! This really comes down to having amazing family and friends who have always supported me, so I’m super proud of all of them too.

I am also proud to do my bit to stand up against inequality and injustice wherever I find it. Last year I wrote an open letter to a couple who delivered a petition against equal marriage to Downing Street and, thanks to a few celebrity re-tweets (including Stephen Fry!), it was read over 55,000 times in a week. And just last week I noticed that the International Olympic Committee’s social media guidelines said that “that’s so gay” was acceptable language. I challenged them about it on Twitter, got lots of LGBT groups involved, and within four hours they changed their policy. These are just two small actions, but I believe that if everyone stands up for what they believe in rather than waiting for someone else to do it, we can all change the world.

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Dear Readers,

Queens of Pop play at Leeds Pride

Queens of Pop play main-stage at Manchester Pride

Queens of Pop play at Glasgow Pride

We have one Pride left to convince. We’ve written this draft letter to ask the Glasgow Pride organisers to take racism and misogyny seriously and rethink their decision to allow Queens of Pop to play Glasgow Pride. If you would like to do the same, we’ve made a template, just pop your name at the bottom and send to pride@prideglasgow.co.uk.

And if you want to get more involved like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/No-Pride-In-Glasgow-Pride/494865133931642

 

—————————————————————————————————-

Dear Mr Smith,

We are writing to you to express our concern that “Queens of Pop” performing at Glasgow Pride could marginalise some of the most vulnerable members of our community in order to give our most powerful members a cheap laugh.

Their videos, depicting violence against women, shaming women’s sexuality, reinforcing body image issues, ridiculing addiction and mental health, turning HIV status into a joke and donning black face don’t reflect the LGBT community we know or want to be part of.

The Unity Centre in Glasgow supports LGBT migrant and asylum seekers placed in Glasgow, many from ethnic minority backgrounds persecuted in their home country for being themselves. Pride should be an opportunity for them to celebrate and claim a little bit of their liberation back. Not a place for them to “take a joke” and “realise it’s not meant to be offensive”. The issue of blackface being something we even have to debate within a minority group beggars belief.

Brighton Pride has stated that Queens of Pop do not represent what they stand for and that they won’t be booked. Leeds Pride has announced that Queens of Pop will not be playing and Manchester Pride has just announced they will not be making a main stage appearance.

The Glasgow Pride Twitter account has previously stated that the act is “amazing”. We wondered if you still think this is the case?

We love Pride and think everyone deserves to have the same welcoming, friendly and affirming experience. We do not believe that Queens of Pop will help achieve this so we’re asking you to reconsider their booking. Will you?

Yours sincerely

<<insert your name here>>
Supporting No Pride In Glasgow Pride

No Pride in Glasgow Pride

Tagged , , , , , , , ,
Advertisements